Timothy Knight NRA Board of Directors

National. Proven. Grassroots. #knight4nra

Timothy Knight

Director - National Rifle Association of America
Currently serving in his 2nd Term 2018-2021

First elected by NRA Members in 2015 &
working with gun owners across the Republic since 2013

Pictures do NOT imply endorsement of Timothy Knight 

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Questions & Answers

These questions are derived from several sources: surveys, many letters, emails and conversations. All answers are my own and are not necessarily the position of either the National Rifle Association or any other entity which I am affiliated. This Q&A is intended to provide NRA Members and gun owners with a foundation to understand who I am and where I stand. I work for and represent them. I am NOT a spokesperson for any organization or association which I am affiliated. Media, please click here for official contact information. No pictures express or imply an endorsement of Timothy Knight unless specifically stated.

Please click on a question
to be linked to my answer.

Do you believe that the Constitution acknowledges rights of all American citizens?

What gun control laws would you consider constitutional, if any?

What gun control laws do you consider to be unconstitutional?

Do you believe that additional gun control laws would result in reduced criminal activity and violence?

Do you support or oppose requiring background checks for those seeking to purchase guns?

Do you support requiring citizens to first meet licensing requirements before purchasing, possessing or carrying a firearm?

Do you support mandatory training for citizens to purchase, possess or carry a firearm?

Do you support the practice known as “Constitutional Carry” which provides that any peaceable citizen may carry a concealed firearm without a permit

What is your position on the practice of open carry?

Do you believe that Americans have a right to own and use "assault weapons" and other such military-pattern firearms?

What is your personal stance on the banning of “bump stocks?”

Can share your thoughts on so called Red Flag laws?

As a member of the NRA's Board of Directors, would you focus on any particular gun laws to either propose for passage or attempt to repeal?

Do you support or oppose citizens engaging in acts of civil disobedience over gun laws?

What improvements do you seek to make as a member of the NRA Board?

How accurate do you believe the NRA political rating system to be?

Do agree with the NRA’s new school safety program known as the “National School Shield?"

Why did you seek both a petition of the members and approval of the nominating committee for the 2018 ballot?

Do NRA members have a means of contacting you to express their views and concerns?  Will you offer a means of asking questions via email?

Anyone can talk a good game when seeking a position.  How do we know that you'll follow through and not simply follow the prevailing winds of NRA management?

When you call yourself the founder of the Colorado, what does that mean?


Getting outside

Snow shoeing in the Colorado backcountry. Like my father, I have had a lifelong appreciation of the great outdoors and sharing it with others.

Do you believe that the Constitution acknowledges rights of all American citizens?

Yes.  Period.  Our national Constitution, one of the most brilliant charters ever created, enshrines an American’s rights from birth or naturalization.  However, experience has taught us that a right unprotected is a right lost and that, left to their own devices, many legislators and administrators at all levels of government will choose to do what is convenient or profitable rather than ask themselves, “Is what I am doing Constitutional?” 

The Constitution is supposed to protect everyone in the Republic and it would help if more of those who have solemnly sworn to uphold and defend it – those passing or enforcing laws, or ruling on legislation - actually read it.  They do not get to choose which rights they like and ignore the rest.   If they don’t like the Constitution, they can change it through the prescribed method.  Until then, it is the law of our land and must be honored by every governmental body from town councils to our employees in Washington, D.C..

It’s also worth saying that if we do not stand up and participate in our Republic we are going to lose it.  When it is not possible to proactively protect our rights, those infringing upon them and imposing legislative and executive tyranny must be held accountable by our citizens, as seen in the recent Colorado recall elections and a myriad of lawsuits.  The defense of liberty will never be easy or fair but chipping away at infringements is part of bearing the burden of supporting the freedoms we enjoy.

 

"Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done, and why. Then do it." - Robert A. Heinlein


What gun control laws would you consider constitutional, if any?

Laws regarding who may possess firearms are somewhat more rational than those that simply regulate inanimate objects and I believe that these are Constitutional restrictions.  However, there is a grey area here as well.  According to 18 U.S.C. § 922(d), "prohibited persons" includes anyone convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment of more than one year, yet sentencing guidelines change frequently.  The group includes users of illegal drugs, yet marijuana is legal in some states but not others.  There is a prohibition against illegal aliens possessing firearms but several Supreme Court rulings have held that such individuals are still protected by the First, Fifth and Fourteen Amendments of the same Constitution.  And, once it is accepted that one class of citizens is less equal than others, that class can be expanded legislatively until it encompasses more and more of us.  We need to tread with care here.

 


Iowa 2014

Sean Maloney (NRA BOD) and myself at the Iowa State capitol on our 2nd Shift 4 Liberty Tour (October, 2014) This was before either Sean or I were on the NRA Board of Directors. Always Grassroots!

What gun control laws do you consider to be unconstitutional?

There are over 20,000 state and federal gun laws that I would consider unconstitutional, most of which concern the possession or carry of a firearm in certain locations, states or municipalities.  I could not possibly list them all but I'll provide a few examples.

Most states require a citizen to pay a registration and/or background check fee in order to obtain a license to own a gun or a permit to carry one.  Yet Murdock vs Pennsylvania, 319 U.S. 105 (1942) ruled that "[a] state cannot impose a license, tax or fee on a constitutionally protected right."  Further, the majority opinion in Follett vs. Town of McCormick, S.C., 321 U.S. 573 (1944) included the observation that “to say that… citizens may be subject to general taxation does not mean that they can be required to pay a tax for the exercise of that which the First Amendment has made a high constitutional privilege.”  I believe that this equally applies to Second Amendment rights, further supporting Murdock’s statement.

Some states, cities, counties and other adminstrative governments impose ammunition or magazine restrictions on law-abiding citizens.  New Jersey, for instance, allows the purchase of hollowpoint ammunition but restricts its possession to the point where it is illegal to carry it on one's person for defensive use.  In Washington, D. C., the CEO of an asset management company was recently convicted of a "gun offense" for the alleged crime of possessing a handful of projectiles for his black-powder muzzleloading rifle.  And of course, New York had already made it illegal to possess a magazine exceeding an arbitrarily-selected limit and has now made things worse with their recently-enacted "SAFE Act," currently being fought in the courts.

Saying that you are not infringing on a citizen's Second Amendment rights because you are "only" restricting their ability to feed the guns they own is absurd, disingenuous and an insult to citizens' intelligence.  It's the equivalent of saying that one can own a car but "cannot affix more than two tires at any given time," or requiring EPA approval to put gas in the tank.

I consider any ban or restriction on the bearing of firearms, possession of ammunition or capacity of magazines by law-abiding citizens to be an unnecessary and unconstitutional burden.  As a private citizen, I have already challenged several of these unjust laws and will continue to do so at every turn. 

 


Connecticut 2014

The Connecticut Citizens Defense League (CCDL) was very kind of set up a rare tour of the Mossberg manufacturing facility on our 2014 2nd Shift 4 Liberty Tour. Mossberg is a massive supporter of the 2nd Amendment and we were honored to get to meet them. Pictured: Sean Maloney (OH), Timothy Knight (CO), Mossberg official (yeah we know who he is), Alexander Roubian (NJ) and Judson "Fravor" Crossland (CO). Picture does not imply endorsement of Timothy Knight.

Do you believe that additional gun control laws would result in reduced criminal activity and violence?

Absolutely not.  It seems that we keep passing new laws when current laws more than suffice.  It is already illegal to kill someone.  Why then pass a law making it somehow "more illegal" based on a killer's motives or implement of murder?  If the initial illegality failed to make an impression, will making redundant laws inspire criminal restraint? 

Laws, by definition, affect only the law abiding and citizens are already in the position of needing to take legal challenges all the way to the Supreme Court simply to exercise their Constitutionally-protected rights.  Adding to the already bloated morass of firearm-related laws serves only to hinder or intimidate gun owners and to demonize firearms. 

 


September 2014 NRA Jay M. Littlefield Grassroots Award

.Left to right: Jim Porter, NRA President in 2014; Victor Head (Pueblo Freedom and Rights); Tim Knight (Basic Freedom Defense Fund); Luke Wagner (BFDF); Erik Groves, (BFDF attorney); Keith Coniglio (BFDF); Chris Cox, NRA-ILA Executive Director. Picture does not imply endorsement of Timothy Knight by the NRA

 

Do you support or oppose requiring background checks for those seeking to purchase guns?

Few people would say that they want convicted criminals or users of illegal drugs to be armed but who defines those terms?  Convicted felons lose most of their rights - but have them restored on completion of their sentences.  It is now perfectly legal to openly purchase and use marijuana in Colorado but not in neighboring Nebraska.  If a Colorado citizens stated that they smoked pot, would a Federal background check allow them to buy a gun in Colorado but deny approval in Nebraska? 

Further, background checks don't actually stop anyone with ill intent.  Multiple studies and surveys underscore that criminals don’t purchase guns, they steal them.  Meanwhile, the perpetrators of almost all mass-killings - both Fort Hood attackers, the Arapahoe High School shooter, the murderer at the Washington Navy Yard, the Virginia Tech shooter, The Long Island Railroad Massacre killer - passed their background checks.

Buyers that fail a background check simply walk away without facing any consequences for their attempted crime (assuming they were not denied in error and approved after demanding further investigation).  Given that they would have just provided all information necessary to find and question them, one might expect some follow up yet none is required or performed. 

There is no provision for them in the Second Amendment; they are ineffective; they are a burden on gun purchasers and insulting, presuming that innocence must be proven before a right can be exercised.  They may currently be the law of the land but I cannot say that I support a placebo.

 


The Magnificent Seven

The men who were tired of the legislative tyranny in Colorado and whom everyone else followed. History might try and record others as having been the spark. Others made their marks & still others became famous or even took credit for their work. But these political novices, strangers to each other before but who made 137 years of Colorado history by accomplishing the impossible: recalling John Morse, President of the Colorado Senate. Some of these men have chosen to remain private individuals. The road paved by these men by 2014 had removed four Colorado legislators and lit a spark for Liberty for a nation.

 

Do you support requiring citizens to first meet licensing requirements before purchasing, possessing or carrying a firearm?

I oppose licensing requirements, as rights do not have a license or a tax. Clearly others disagree and I consider it my work to empower others to chip away at these restrictions. The Second Amendment is the foundation of our liberty as Americans and if it is gone, the rest of the rights enshrined in the Constitution lose their protection.  Rather than adding requirements to our right, communities should be encouraging its exercise.

 


The Constitution State

Sean Maloney and myself visiting a gun shop in Connecticut during our 2014 2nd Shift 4 Liberty Tour. Meeting members and 2nd Amendment advocates face to face, letting them know that real people around the nation not only stand with them, but are willing to work with them is key to protecting our rights. We stand together or fall apart.

 

Do you support mandatory training for citizens to purchase, possess or carry a firearm?

No, I do not support mandatory training.  No other right requires such training and, once made mandatory, those requirements can be adjusted incrementally until all but the politically connected could meet them.

That being said, rights do require understanding of how ones actions affect others.  Possession of a tool does not equal competence with it and the same can be said of firearms.  I spent much of my childhood shooting under well-qualified supervision and as an adult I sought some of the world's best-known experts to improve my understanding.  I highly recommend that anyone who assumes the mighty responsibility that comes with the right to bear arms voluntarily seek qualified training.

 


The NRA is it’s members

Working with both volunteers and NRA Grassroots staff is super rewarding. Showing other member and gun owners how they can make a difference is what grassroots is all about.

 

Do you support the practice known as “Constitutional Carry” which provides that any peaceable citizen may carry a concealed firearm without a permit?

Yes I do. Several states with long-standing cultures of firearms ownership (Arizona, Wyoming, Alaska and Vermont) have reinforced the constitutionally expressed understanding of the right to bear arms by removing barriers to Constitutional Carry.  While I respect the idea of states' sovereign rights, it seems irrational and objectionable that some states are "less free" than others.  I will be working to help other states' legislators - and citizens - understand how this practice benefits their communities and encourages both liberty and security rather than treating the two as mutually exclusive conditions.

 


Standing with Citizens

These are your rights, not theirs to take. These are your choices, not theirs to limit. When you get your ballot, stand up and fire those employees who have taken what is yours!

Hold your ground, Connecticut. You are not alone - Tim Knight, Oct 2014

 

What is your position on the practice of open carry?

I agree with open carry and do practice it in some places, however I recognize that it can cause problems due to misconceptions and mixed perceptions.  Having been around firearms my whole life, I notice when someone is openly carrying one but do not necessarily consider them a threat. Their behavior with that firearm determines my behavior towards them.  However, those who have been immersed in a firearms-restrictive culture consider carrying a gun as the purview of law enforcement, the military or criminals rather than as an individual right.  The mere sight of a gun without a badge or uniform can cause shock or alarm.

Such perceptions are not justification for infringing upon the rights of free citizens but neither should they be ignored by the gun owning community.  While the word "compromise" has become a euphemism for "give up your rights," I believe there is room for it here so long as it is on an individual and not legislative basis.  I do not believe in or support laws that restrict the individual right to openly carry a legally-owned firearm.  However, I believe that fellow gun owners should seek to educate those who are alarmed by it rather than take a combative, "It's my right so deal with it" stance that only serves to reinforce stereotypes. 

Encounters with fellow citizens who do not come from a "gun world" are opportunities to illustrate that guns don’t “just go off” or jump out of holsters and that the presence of a firearm does not alter the normalcy of anyone's day.  It's an expression of a Constitutional right, as much as wearing a t-shirt with a political slogan or religious image.  It's a chance to plant a small seed of liberty in the mind of someone who may not have seen such freedom before and may never do so again.  Exercise your right but remember to also see it as an opportunity to educate and grow our numbers.

 


When the call came for input on recalls in California I not only took the call, I hopped on a plane. Being a native of California and watching liberty being eroded there, or anywhere of that matter, if I can help, I will be there. Due to federal investigation, which later made national news, the recall windows closed. But it was an attempt to stand and we can never give up. Not one state in our Republic is worth losing. This picture does not imply endorsement of Timothy Knight.

When the call came for input on recalls in California I not only took the call, I hopped on a plane. Being a native of California and watching liberty being eroded there, or anywhere of that matter, if I can help, I will be there. Due to federal investigation, which later made national news, the recall windows closed. But it was an attempt to stand and we can never give up. Not one state in our Republic is worth losing. This picture does not imply endorsement of Timothy Knight.

 

Do you believe that Americans have a right to own and use "assault weapons" and other such military-pattern firearms?

Yes, though the former is a misnomer.  The often vilified and fictitiously named “assault weapon” may resemble rifles fielded as weapons of war but, in fact, not a single army in the world issues semi-automatic-only rifles for combat use.  A semi-automatic AR-15 or semi-automatic AK-47 is no more or less lethal than any hunter's semi-automatic deer rifle - all fire one round for each pull of the trigger.  When politicians hold press conferences to vilify an inanimate object as opposed to addressing societal problems, we should all be suspicious of their motives.

 


Buckeyes stand

When the Colorado Recalls needed help most of the leadership teams from Buckeye Firearms Association flew out to help. Pictured (L to R): Linda Walker (BFA & NRA BOD), Luke Wagner (CO Recall/BFDF), Keith Coniglio (CO Recall/BFDF), Laura Carno (CO Recall/Independent political figure), Timothy Knight (CO Recall/BFDF), Ohio guy (BFA), Not shown Sean Maloney (BFA & NRA BOD).

 

as a member of the NRA's Board of Directors, would you focus on any particular gun laws to either propose for passage or attempt to repeal?

Almost all Federal and state legislation in regards to “gun free schools” has epically failed our children.  More laws have done nothing to protect them.  I will work to see responsible local solutions put in place to protect our children and all legislation that hinders our children’s safety removed.  Good intentions are not protecting our children.  It's time for new plans. 

Watch this space for coming updates.

 


We do this together

Just arrived in Connecticut and right to meeting folks and making phone calls. Retail politics, in my case means really taking the time to get meaningful things done and connecting with real people. This is not some campaign, it is who I am and what I always do. A Hand shake, my word and holding the line with good people.

 

Do you support or oppose citizens engaging in acts of civil disobedience over gun laws?

This is actually a fairly easy question for me to answer.  I not only support the idea of engaging in civil protest over infringement of Constitutional rights, I believe it is a citizen's duty to the Republic to do so.  I founded the successful Colorado recall movement, consulted on the fledgling California recall movement (rendered temporarily moot by the Federal corruption investigation of several state legislators) and provided guidance and advice on the recall movement explored in New Jersey.

I was moved to action by what I felt was blatant legislative tyranny, with legislators listening solely to their political party leadership while utterly disregarding the outpouring of opposition from the citizenry.  There was no conversation, there was no discussion, there was no respect for citizen input.  There was only a kangaroo court established for public comment and then a steamrolling of our rights that included last-second changes to established protocols to dilute continued public testimony against their game plan. 

This type of behavior is unacceptable in our Republic.  I will do whatever I am able in order to oppose it where it exists and I would ask all free citizens to do the same.

 


137 Years in the making.

A few minuets after winning Colorado's first recall election in 2013, making Colorado a bit more free, standing with fellow Colorado recall brothers. This modified Colorado flag (the color fields are reversed) is a symbol of citizens standing for Liberty across the nation.

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5 years later

In 2018, five years to the day, we got back together to remember what we did.

 

What improvements DO you seek to make as a member of the NRA Board?

As is true of every civil rights organization or advocacy group, the NRA needs to be run like both a business and a political machine (NRA-ILA), which complicates its effectiveness.  Finding a balance is always a struggle, but any good organization always strives for improvement.

The first area of improvement must be awakening our members to their individual responsibility to protect our rights.  Every generation removed from our nation's founding and its struggle for freedom has been harder to convince that the gift we were given needs to be diligently and constantly protected.  With our busy and challenging lives, many citizens are not engaging or they are simply walking away, leaving the Republic for others to “manage.”  Too many have given their right by proxy to some organization protect.  NRA members - and those who should be NRA members - are no different.

The very recent successful Colorado recalls have invigorated Second Amendment activism and the leadership of the NRA & the NRA-ILA see it.  Director Chris Cox himself has, on several occasions, mentioned in his monthly articles that members need to take the Colorado grassroots example and stand up for their rights.  It is not enough for NRA members to "chip in a few bucks" to the NRA-ILA and expect them to handle every challenge around the nation.  It is time to stand as individual citizens; to pay your dues but stay involved locally.

Next, the NRA needs to do a better job of empowering those members who are willing to rise to the challenge and support our rights.  Be under no illusion that that is easy work either.  Getting people beyond strong words and business card swapping is difficult and I believe the NRA needs to improve its grassroots programs, then advertise and recruit for them, providing better direction and training in political activism. 

The organization also needs to perform a better analysis of their allies and state affiliates.  The need to identify local partners who know the landscape and are effective at communicating to their community versus those who merely see themselves as "just shooting clubs" who passively watch from the sidelines.

Watch this space for coming updates!

 


2A Media, yep I do that.

Appearing on NRA News: Cam & Company in September, 2104. Cam & I discussed the importance of people getting involved in politics.We need all hands on deck and I am on a continuing quest to get more people involved. Picture does NOT imply endorsement

 

How accurate do you believe the NRA political rating system to be ?

I think that the current NRA rating system is not perfect, but it is a good indicator of a candidates thought process.  Grades are based on voting records, if a candidate has one, and a survey/questionnaire which focuses only on a narrow set of topics related to the 2ndAmendment, hunting or other related issues specific to the state or national concerns (see a sample survey/questionnaire).  It works to serve our members' understanding of the stance of lawmakers and candidates.  Like any rating system, those who are rated can change their minds or choose a different political direction.  Some NRA members were not fans of the now retired Senator Harry Reid, and until a few years ago he had remained openly supportive of Second Amendment.  He gave gun owners serious pause when he made call for “universal background checks” which will in effect create national gun registration. Turning on the 2nd Amendment did not work out well in 2013 for Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia either. He had been “A” rated before he proposed the same kind of ill-conceived background checks on gun sales. These surveys/questionnaires are very helpful when determining which canidaes to support at the state level.

Politicians can often get caught up in public emotions and both forget their oaths and responsibility to defend the Constitution. We as citizens and members of the NRA must always keep the pressure on all politicians.

I highly suggest that all canidates send all survey/questionnaires to the given/listed address via registered, return recipt mail in addition to the fax or email listed. Keep a copy and share it with voters. Many canidates don’t retuen survays. If you are a canidate and you have not received a survey/questionnaire, please contact the NRA state liaison or NRA-ILA directly.

 


 

Do agree with the NRA’s new school safety program known as the “National School Shield?”

Yes.  The very fact that the NRA is addressing a crisis that society has chosen to disregard for decades - our schoolchildren being left unprotected - is very promising.  Solutions are what our children need and the NRA is the sole national voice offering to make a real difference.

No other organization or Federal program has offered real solutions and continued tragedies prove to me that a change is needed.  While some progress has been made in some localities, others in state capitols and Washington, D.C. merely pass more hollow laws which have not stopped tragic school shootings.  Our children deserve at least the same protection we afford our money, dignitaries, politicians and airplanes.

Having policies and plans that fit the local needs and resources is clearly the best plan. We must be careful not to create some Federal "one size fits all" solution and are better off creating a program that helps each school and district find the best, most effective solution for its needs. The NRA National Shield Program is working to do just this with no public funding.

Watch this space for updates from my involvement in this program.

 

Grassroots

Taking a few minuets to catch up with Chris Cox NRA-ILA. They were key allies in the 2013 Colorado Recalls. Also shown is Jennifer Kerns who served as our spokeswoman, media consultant and political advisor. She took a risk on a bunch of political novices. Glad to have her on the team.


 

Why DID you SEEK BOTH a petition of the members AND approval of the nominating committee for the 2018 ballot?

I believe that the members of the National Rifle Association are the most important part of the Association and I will always seek their approval by way of a member nomination while serving on the Board.  Rarely do people who only seek such “nomination from the members” gain a Board seat but I never take the easy way out and NRA members deserve that degree of respect if I am asking them for support.  They have already seen my efforts (please read my bio) and I have earned both their nomination and later their vote on the 2015 and 2018 ballots. 

As for the NRA nominating committee, I had not yet had the opportunity to work with many of them in 2015 and so did not seek the committee’s recommendation.  Being effective in justifying my message and gaining member nomination for 2018 was hard work but worth doing, and I consider it an honor to have proven myself to our current Board members.

I am humbled and honored to serve and do so tirelessly - our Republic deserves nothing less.  I hope both the NRA's members and leadership can see the strength of my work for the Second Amendment and envision the success I can bring our Association as a ceaseless and effective proponent.

 


 

do NRA members have a means of contacting you to express their views and concerns?  Will you offer a means of asking questions via email?

Absolutely.  Service is not always easy work but listening to those you represent is vital to growth and success and even negative comments can help improve your thought process.  I work for the members, please let me hear from you:

If you would like to write or email me please do so. Important 🚨Include your name & NRA membership number so your mail or email will be forwarded to me. Without these ☝🏻your letter or email 📧 will NOT make it to me.

Write me: 
NRA Office of the Secretary
NRA Board of Directors
Attention Timothy Knight 
11250 Waples Mill Road
Fairfax, VA 22030

OR

e-mail 📧nrabod@nrahq.org 
Attention Timothy Knight
Include a Membership number in your email or it will NOT be forwarded.

For full impact please print your email, put a stamp on it and send it via mail to the NRA HQ. It is important that the NRA realize that members are communicating to their Board so these are the preferred ways to communicate with me (and hopefully the whole board as well).


The names of all the current NRA Directors are listed in every official journal or magazine every month. Yeah it is not a secret


I also maintain an office address at my own expense for members' letters and I will do so long as I remain on the NRA Board of Directors.  The address will be openly published here and will be updated should any changes be needed.   Currently that address is:

Timothy Knight
200 W.Martin Luther King Blvd.
Suite 1000
Chattanooga, TN 37402
United States

I will also be visible; walking the floor of annual meetings, attending Friend of the NRA events and other events. So please come find me, I will have a name tag on.

 


 

Anyone can talk a good game when seeking a position.  How do we know that you'll follow through and not simply follow the prevailing winds of NRA management?

I can only answer this question based on what I have done and my promise that my habits and professionalism will continue.  As previously mentioned, I founded Colorado's recall movement and have been involved with other recall campaigns through the nation.  I am not one for idle talk.

As a Board member, it is my role to help define the organization's direction and correct errors but, more importantly, it places me in a position to be a strong voice of opposition and head off problems before they become policy. 

Watch this space for upcoming plans to continue to make a difference.

[T]he people are not to be disarmed of their weapons. They are left in full possession of them.
— Zacharia Johnson, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 25, 1778